Indian Journal of Anaesthesia  
About us | Editorial board | Search | Ahead of print | Current Issue | Past Issues | Instructions
Home | Login  | Users Online: 861  Print this pageEmail this pageSmall font sizeDefault font sizeIncrease font size    




 
 Table of Contents    
CORRESPONDENCE
Year : 2011  |  Volume : 55  |  Issue : 3  |  Page : 322  

Air-conditioning for infection control


Department of Anaesthesia, Anaesthesiologist and Member of Infection Control Committee, Dr. Ahmed Abanamy Hospital, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia

Date of Web Publication7-Jul-2011

Correspondence Address:
Mohd Saif Ghaus
Dr. Ahmed Abanamy Hospital, PO Box 91395, Near Exit 9, Al Hamra, Riyadh - 11633
Saudi Arabia
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0019-5049.82674

Rights and Permissions

How to cite this article:
Ghaus MS. Air-conditioning for infection control. Indian J Anaesth 2011;55:322

How to cite this URL:
Ghaus MS. Air-conditioning for infection control. Indian J Anaesth [serial online] 2011 [cited 2019 Oct 18];55:322. Available from: http://www.ijaweb.org/text.asp?2011/55/3/322/82674

I have read with interest the article "If air conditioning is not functioning …" Indian J Anaesth 2010; 54:580, by Dr. Medha Mohta. As an anaesthetist who also has an interest in the field of infection control, I would like to add to what Dr Mohta had to say. [1]

Worldwide, the "Centers of Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)" and "Healthcare Infection Control Practices Advisory Committee (HICPAC)" are considered to be the pioneers and leading authorities in the field of infection control. If we may remember, the CDC was one of the main organizations guiding us in the fight against the spread of the H1N1 virus and in its control.

The CDC and HICPAC have laid down "Guidelines for environmental infection control in health care facilities"[2] and "Guideline for Prevention of Surgical Site Infection." [3] The former guidelines have been laid down with the aim to prevent adverse incidents in, and adverse outcomes for, the patients and health care workers due to exposure to infectious pathogens; while the latter guidelines, as the name suggests, have been laid out to prevent surgical site infections. This, I hope, may also be of interest to our surgeon friends. The guidelines state the following:

  1. Maintain positive-pressure ventilation with respect to corridors and adjacent areas.
  2. Maintain >15 ACH (air changes per hour), of which >3 ACH should be fresh air.
  3. Filter all re-circulated and fresh air through appropriate filters, providing at least 90% efficiency (dust-spot testing).
  4. In rooms not engineered for horizontal laminar airflow, introduce air at the ceiling and exhaust air near the floor.


In Indian hospitals, these guidelines can be met with a well-functioning air-conditioning system. Lack of air-conditioning means absence of positive-pressure ventilation, air changes and filtering. Hence air-conditioning should be viewed by us as an instrument to provide better health care to our patients and to protect us from exposure to infectious agents.

 
   References Top

1.Medha M. If the air conditioning is not functioning… Indian J Anaesth 2010;54:580.  Back to cited text no. 1
    
2.Sehulster L, Chinn RY. Guidelines for Environmental Infection Control in Health-Care Facilities. Recommendations of CDC and the Healthcare Infection Control Practices Advisory Committee (HICPAC). MMWR Recomm Rep 20036;52:1-42. Available from: http://www.cdc.gov. [Last accessed on 24 Feb 2011].  Back to cited text no. 2
    
3.Guideline for Prevention of Surgical Site Infection, 1999. Recommendations of CDC and the Healthcare Infection Control Practices Advisory Committee (HICPAC). Available from: http://www.cdc.gov. [Last accessed on 24 Feb 2011].  Back to cited text no. 3
    




 

Top
 
  Search
 
    Similar in PUBMED
   Search Pubmed for
   Search in Google Scholar for
    Access Statistics
    Email Alert *
    Add to My List *
* Registration required (free)  

 
  In this article
    References

 Article Access Statistics
    Viewed1395    
    Printed57    
    Emailed0    
    PDF Downloaded329    
    Comments [Add]    

Recommend this journal