Indian Journal of Anaesthesia  
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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2018  |  Volume : 62  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 36-46

Maternal and anaesthesia-related risk factors and incidence of spinal anaesthesia-induced hypotension in elective caesarean section: A multinomial logistic regression


1 Department of Epidemiology, School of Health, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran
2 Department of Epidemiology, Research Centre for Health Sciences, Institute of Health, School of Health, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran
3 Department of Anaesthesia, Shiraz Anaesthesiology and Critical Care Research Centre, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran
4 Shiraz Anaesthesiology and Critical Care Research Centre, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Haleh Ghaem
Department of Epidemiology, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, School of Health, Alzahra Street, 16 Valley, Shiraz
Iran
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/ija.IJA_416_17

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Background and Aims: Although spinal anaesthesia (SA) is nowadays the preferred anaesthesia technique for caesarean section (CS), it is associated with considerable haemodynamic effects, such as maternal hypotension. This study aimed to evaluate a wide range of variables (related to parturient and anaesthesia techniques) associated with the incidence of different degrees of SA-induced hypotension during elective CS. Methods: This prospective study was conducted on 511 mother–infant pairs, in which the mother underwent elective CS under SA. The data were collected through preset proforma containing three parts related to the parturient, anaesthetic techniques and a table for recording maternal blood pressure. It was hypothesized that some maternal (such as age) and anaesthesia-related risk factors (such as block height) were associated with occurance of SA-induced hypotension during elective CS. Results: The incidence of mild, moderate and severe hypotension was 20%, 35% and 40%, respectively. Eventually, ten risk factors were found to be associated with hypotension, including age >35 years, body mass index ≥25 kg/m2, 11–20 kg weight gain, gravidity ≥4, history of hypotension, baseline systolic blood pressure (SBP) <120 mmHg and baseline heart rate >100 beats/min in maternal modelling, fluid preloading ≥1000 ml, adding sufentanil to bupivacaine and sensory block height >T4in anaesthesia-related modelling (P < 0.05). Conclusion: Age, body mass index, weight gain, gravidity, history of hypotension, baseline SBP and heart rate, fluid preloading, adding sufentanil to bupivacaine and sensory block hieght were the main risk factors identified in the study for SA-induced hypotension during CS.


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