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CLINICAL INVESTIGATION
Year : 2010  |  Volume : 54  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 137-141

Effect of clonidine and magnesium sulphate on anaesthetic consumption, haemodynamics and postoperative recovery: A comparative study


1 Department of Anaesthesiology, N.R.S. Medical College, Kolkata, India
2 Department of Anaesthesiology, Calcutta National Medical College, Kolkata, India
3 Calcutta Medical Research Institute, Kolkata, India

Correspondence Address:
Dhurjoti Prosad Bhattacharjee
38/11A, Mondal Para Lane, Kolkata - 700 090
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0019-5049.63659

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This randomised, placebo-controlled, double-blind study was designed to assess the effect of intravenous clonidine and magnesium sulphate on intraoperative haemodynamics, anaesthetic consumption and postoperative recovery. Seventy five patients undergoing elective upper limb orthopaedic surgery were randomised into three groups. Group C received clonidine 3 μg/kg as a bolus before induction and 1μg/kg/hour by infusion intraopertively. Group M received magnesium sulphate 30 mg/kg as a bolus before induction and 10 mg/kg/hour by infusion. Group P received same volume of isotonic saline. Anaesthesia was induced and maintained with fentanyl citrate and propofol. Muscular relaxation was achieved by vecuronium bromide. Induction time, recovery time and consumption of propofol as well as fentanyl citrate were recorded. Induction of anaesthesia was rapid with both clonidine and magnesium sulphate. Time of bispectral index (BIS) to reach 60 was significantly lower in Group C and Group M (P < 0.0001). Requirements of propofol and fentanyl were significantly less in Group C and Group M (P < 0.001). Postoperative recovery was slower in Group M compared with other two groups (P < 0.001). Perioperative use of both clonidine and magnesium sulphate significantly reduced the consumption of propofol and fentanyl citrate. Magnesium sulphate caused a delayed recovery.


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