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LETTER TO EDITOR
Year : 2015  |  Volume : 59  |  Issue : 7  |  Page : 458-459  

Commentary: Minimising intraoperative exposure of ionising radiation to anaesthesiologists


Department of Anaesthesiology, BMCRI, Fort, Bangalore, Karnataka, India

Date of Web Publication16-Jul-2015

Correspondence Address:
R S Raghavendra Rao
Department of Anaesthesiology, BMCRI, Fort, Bangalore, Karnataka
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0019-5049.160974

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How to cite this article:
Raghavendra Rao R S. Commentary: Minimising intraoperative exposure of ionising radiation to anaesthesiologists. Indian J Anaesth 2015;59:458-9

How to cite this URL:
Raghavendra Rao R S. Commentary: Minimising intraoperative exposure of ionising radiation to anaesthesiologists. Indian J Anaesth [serial online] 2015 [cited 2021 Apr 21];59:458-9. Available from: https://www.ijaweb.org/text.asp?2015/59/7/458/160974

The anaesthesiologists and radiologists constitute the high-risk personnel getting exposure to radiation during diagnostic and therapeutic radiological procedures. [1] It has become the need of the hour for the anaesthesia providers to be in close contact with the patient both inside and outside the operative room.

The unit of radiation is known as grey (Gy) (1 Gy = 100 rad) and when absorbed that dose is termed as Sievert (Sv). The dose limit for the exposure stays in the range of 150Sv-500Sv/year. [2] Multiplying and metabolically active cells are most sensitive to radiation hazards. The exposure hazards range from the simplest skin injury and cataract to the most lethal hazard, malignancy. [3] The harmful effect of radiation is more pronounced in pregnant women when the exposure is continuous, and more intense with dose greater than 0.5 Gy. [4]

Monitoring at the thyroid collar, inside and outside the protective gear of lead apron is advisable for all staff. [5] The education and awareness about the risk involved, care that needs to be exercised are to be highlighted to all the susceptible health care personnel. The infrastructure plan and safe positions so as to minimise the effects are to be understood. [6] The basic principle of prevention such as limiting the time of exposure keeping a safe distance and use of proper protective shield should be strictly adhered to. [7] Since the radiation beam is most often directed perpendicularly, the anaesthesiologists when standing at head end of the patient, may receive lesser dose of radiation. Hence proper positioning of anaesthesiologist is essential to minimize the risk of radiation. Anaesthesia workstation could be used as an additional shield by rotating it to 180° such that the back of the equipment is facing the operative field thus giving the anaesthesiologist an additional cover. [8]

 
   References Top

1.
Berry AJ, Katz JD. Occupational health. In: Barash PG, Cullen BF, Stoelting RK, Cahalan MK, Stock MC, editors. Clinical Anesthesia. Philadelphia, PA: Lippincott Williams and Wilkins; 2009. p. 57-81.  Back to cited text no. 1
    
2.
United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Biological effects of radiation. Reactor Concepts Manual Part 2. Ch. 9. United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission Technical Training Centre. Available from: http://www.pbadupws.nrc.gov/docs/ML0230/ML023020586.pdf. [Last accessed on 2012 Mar 11].  Back to cited text no. 2
    
3.
Phillips G, Monaghan WP. Radiation safety for anesthesia providers. AANA J 2011;79:257-67.  Back to cited text no. 3
    
4.
Kambarami T. Radiation safety. Anaesthesia refresher course: Part 1. 2014;17:1-8.  Back to cited text no. 4
    
5.
United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Biological effects of radiation. Reactor Concepts Manual Part 2. Ch. 9. United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission Technical Training Centre. Available from: http://pbadupws.nrc.gov/docs/ML0230/ML023020586.pdf. [Last accessed on 2012 Mar 11].  Back to cited text no. 5
    
6.
International Commission on Radiological Protection. The 2007 recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection. ICRP Publication 103. Ann ICRP 2007;37:1-332.  Back to cited text no. 6
    
7.
Taylor J, Chandramohan M, Simpson KH. Radiation safety for anaesthetists. Contin Educ Anaesth Crit Care Pain 2012. Available from: http://ceaccp.oxfordjournals.org/content/early/2012/11/04/bjaceaccp.mks055.full.pdf+html. [Last accessed on 2015 Jun 16].  Back to cited text no. 7
    
8.
Marcus A. Glowing risk: Anaesthesiologists exposure to radiation on the job. Anesthesiol News 2009;35:10.  Back to cited text no. 8
    




 

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