Indian Journal of Anaesthesia

LETTER TO EDITOR
Year
: 2011  |  Volume : 55  |  Issue : 3  |  Page : 320--321

Challenges in the management of obese parturient


Preety Mittal Roy1, Vimarsh Madan2, Vijaya Pant2, Jyotirmoy Das1,  
1 Department of Anaesthesiology and Critical Care, Medanta The Medicity, Gurgaon, India
2 Department of Anaesthesiology, Pain Management and Perioperative Care, Fortis Hospital, Shalimar Bagh, New Delhi, India

Correspondence Address:
Preety Mittal Roy
Department of Anaesthesiology and Critical Care, Medanta The Medicity, Gurgaon
India




How to cite this article:
Roy PM, Madan V, Pant V, Das J. Challenges in the management of obese parturient.Indian J Anaesth 2011;55:320-321


How to cite this URL:
Roy PM, Madan V, Pant V, Das J. Challenges in the management of obese parturient. Indian J Anaesth [serial online] 2011 [cited 2021 Apr 19 ];55:320-321
Available from: https://www.ijaweb.org/text.asp?2011/55/3/320/82669


Full Text

Sir,

We read with great interest the article "Morbidly obese parturient: Challenges for the anaesthesiologist, including managing the difficult airway in obstetrics. What is new?" by Rao and Rao. [1] However, there are certain points which need further discussion.

Foetal dose with conventional chest X-ray is is less than 0.01 mGy. Even then, diagnostic radiological procedures should be performed during pregnancy only if the information to be gained from the study is necessary for the care of the patient as per the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) Committee Opinion. [2] Pulmonary function test would be more ideal for the preoperative assessment of degree of restrictive lung disease in obese parturient.

Beta blockers are classified as category C as per the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) classification, which means that animal studies have revealed adverse foetal effects, but there are no controlled data in women. Potential maternal benefit must always be weighed against the foetal side effects. [3] If beta blockers are prescribed, it is recommended to monitor foetal heart rate and intrauterine growth. They should be discontinued before labour. After delivery, monitoring of neonatal heart rate, respiratory status and blood sugar is essential.

The Abe formula [lumbar puncture depth (cm) = 1 + 17 weight (kg)/height (cm)] might be a more reliable predictor for estimating the required LP needle length. [4] It is prudent to select a longer needle for an obese patient if the formula calculates a depth that is barely within the range of the needle at hand to reduce the number of attempts and patient discomfort.

References

1Rao DP, Rao VA. Morbidly obese parturient: Challenges for the anaesthesiologist, including managing the diffi cult airway in obstetrics. What is new? Indian J Anaesth 2010;54:508-21.
2ACOG Committee on Obstetric Practice. American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists Committee Opinion #299, September 2004 (replaces No. 158, September 1995). Guidelines for Diagnostic Imaging During Pregnancy. Obstet Gynecol. 2004;104:647-51.
3Libby P. Pregnancy and heart disease. Braunwald E, Libby: Braunwald's Heart Disease: A textbook Of Cardiovascular Medicine, 8 th edition, Philadelphia: Saunders Elsevier; 2008. p. 1976.
4Abe KK, Yamamoto LG, Jtoman EM, Nakasone TA, Kanayama SK. Lumbar puncture needle length determination. Am J Emerg Med 2005;23:742-46.